Mushrooms

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BrookeRN
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Mushrooms

#1 Post by BrookeRN » Sat Aug 18, 2018 1:47 am

I inoculated a cherry log with shitake spores on dowels 5 months ago. Then put beeswax over holes. They are on a pallet in the shade. Did I need to keep them damp? Help! Im a newbie to mushrooms!

dirtmurphy
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Re: Mushrooms

#2 Post by dirtmurphy » Sat Aug 18, 2018 3:06 am

Yeah, they need to have some moisture if it hasn't been raining. Lift the log. If it's light, you should soak it. I soak my logs overnight in a wading pool that I picked up at a yard sale. In addition to putting wax over the holes, I also wax the ends of the log to help preserve moisture. How many logs do you have? If you have several logs, stacking them together will also help to conserve moisture. Good luck with your mushrooms!

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Re: Mushrooms

#3 Post by BrookeRN » Sat Aug 18, 2018 6:37 pm

Thanks! Will do!

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Gekko
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Re: Mushrooms

#4 Post by Gekko » Sat Aug 25, 2018 10:09 pm

Dirtmurphy, If one gets a mushroom harvest is it easy to collect the spores to start another log culture?

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Re: Mushrooms

#5 Post by dirtmurphy » Sun Aug 26, 2018 1:21 am

I don't know anyone who collects spores. Everyone I've learned from does a tissue culture from the harvested mushroom. Look up the type of mushroom you're using to find out where the best spot is to collect the tissue (cap or stem). You're looking for dry and fluffy interior tissue. Excise the tissue with a blade dosed in alcohol. You know how cardboard is made of two layers? You need to dampen the cardboard and separate the layers. Shred the mushroom tissue and place the shreds inside the layers and roll them up like a blanket to conserve the moisture. Place the rolled up cardboard in a plastic baggie that is only partially closed. The mycelium will need some oxygen to stay alive. Keep it in a cool place for a couple of weeks. Once the cardboard is completely colonized you can use it to inoculate whatever substrate it prefers or you can keep adding cardboard to increase the size of your culture.
I have used this method to inoculate used chicken bedding with oyster mushrooms. I haven't used it yet to inoculate logs but Tradd Cotter describes doing so in his book Organic Mushroom Farming and Mycoremediation. According to him, you can stack log rounds end to end like a totem pole with the myceliated cardboard between each round. I only collect spores to aid in identification when foraging.
I hope this helps. Cardboard cultures can take a while to get right but it's a cool skill to have.

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Re: Mushrooms

#6 Post by SmartLikeTruck » Mon Sep 10, 2018 8:17 am

I've not tried the cardboard method but I've had success using tissue samples of grocery store button and king oyster mushrooms on pasteurized grain.
Rye seems to be most often used for grain, I've personally used wheat and barley and both worked great.

I'm glad I stumbled into this thread as it's a reminder to pick up a copy of Radical Mycology by Peter McCoy, from what I've heard/read it's one of the best starting points for home or small scale mycology.

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Re: Mushrooms

#7 Post by Andy F » Mon Sep 10, 2018 10:25 am

Radical Mycology Free PDF Download here https://ia802307.us.archive.org/9/items ... cology.pdf

Description: Mushrooms tend to get a bad rap amongst many foragers because of a fear poisoning and/or a fear of the unknown. Radical Mycology demystifies mushrooms, explaining how they grow, different types of mushrooms, how to cultivate them, and how to preserve them. The authors also included a lengthy section on identifying common edible wild mushrooms.


The Librarian is always happy to help out :lol:
Ya'll are more adventurous than I am. Living in desert, not sure what I would have to do to grow mushrooms.
'Shroom onward!

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