Calorie Dense Crops

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Foo
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Re: Calorie Dense Crops

#11 Post by Foo » Thu Jun 27, 2019 5:22 pm

On Youtube, I found a couple of videos on Rob Greenfield who is growing or foraging everything he eats for 1 year. He is in the Orlando area right now so the issues he has may be a bit different than a lot of other peoples. But he did say something very instructive about having some staple crops that can produce the bulk of your calories given the climate location and plants that do well in your area.


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Re: Calorie Dense Crops

#13 Post by Oldplaner » Sat Feb 22, 2020 7:10 pm

Hi, this is my first post although we've been watching the Ice Age Farmer reports on youtube for awhile.
We've been seriously growing our own food for the past 5 years with the main crops being potatoes,Red Silkbeans(mostly for drying) Floriani Corn,peas and carrots,onions and garlic.The last 3 years we've also grown a patch of sweet sorghum and process it into syrup-two gallons a year. Sorghum also gives seed heads for flour or poultry feed.

The corn,we dry and then grind up into corn meal for pancakes or corn bread and also turn wood ash from the wood cook stove into lye water to nixtamalize the corn for making tortillas. Field corn from a feed store works great too. Tonight we are having tacos with the homemade torillas and refried beans. It's good to show the kids and grandchildren where our food used to come from.

We don't consider ourselves preppers because really, we are the first generation in history that doesn't put up food for the winter. Certainly our parents and grandparents did this routinely and my parents didn't grow up with a freezer and Mum said they had a box buried in the ground in the back yard to keep butter and milk cool when she grew up in the 1930's and 40's

I hope to learn of ideas others have and what works as far as food security and hope we can help others as well.


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Re: Calorie Dense Crops

#14 Post by Oldplaner » Sat Feb 22, 2020 7:28 pm

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Re: Calorie Dense Crops

#15 Post by Oldplaner » Sat Feb 22, 2020 7:33 pm

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The sorghum iscpassed through this little hand cranked press then the juice is boiled off. Basically 10 gals juice gives 1 gal syrup. It's planted around the 1st of may and harvested 3rd week in sept
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Re: Calorie Dense Crops

#16 Post by TexasHomesteader » Mon Mar 02, 2020 9:35 pm

Oldplaner wrote:
Sat Feb 22, 2020 7:10 pm
Hi, this is my first post although we've been watching the Ice Age Farmer reports on youtube for awhile.
We've been seriously growing our own food for the past 5 years with the main crops being potatoes,Red Silkbeans(mostly for drying) Floriani Corn,peas and carrots,onions and garlic.The last 3 years we've also grown a patch of sweet sorghum and process it into syrup-two gallons a year. Sorghum also gives seed heads for flour or poultry feed.

The corn,we dry and then grind up into corn meal for pancakes or corn bread and also turn wood ash from the wood cook stove into lye water to nixtamalize the corn for making tortillas. Field corn from a feed store works great too. Tonight we are having tacos with the homemade torillas and refried beans. It's good to show the kids and grandchildren where our food used to come from.
Howdy!

I don't post much either but this year I'm moving towards your model where I'm growing potatoes, sweet potatoes, corn, beans, sorghum, buckwheat and I'm even trying some Emmer wheat right now. Sorghum and buckwheat will be new to me but if the family does not like it, we can use the grain for chicken feed. Chickens are important to my family's diet and while mine free range, they need more nutrition to lay really well and that's something i don't see a lot of folks talking about (how they are going to feed their chickens, ducks, geese).

Of course I'm growing more traditional things like tomatoes, peppers, carrots, kale, etc...

I hope to dry much of the traditional crops so I can add them to soups and stews as well as use straight from the garden. In one of the homestead groups I'm in on Facebook, a woman suggested that if you're canning tomatoes, save the skins, dry them thoroughly and pulverize them into a powder which she uses to amp up tomato taste in cooking.

And I have fruit trees and shrubs (peaches, apples, figs, pears, blueberries and blackberries.

We run on only 2 acres but I'm trying to see how much we can get out of the land. I've been here only 2 years so there is a LOT to do. Picture below of a few of my chickens helping out clear more garden space. :D
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Re: Calorie Dense Crops

#17 Post by Farside » Thu Mar 05, 2020 10:17 pm

I wish it grew up here in Canada. I guess we have maple syrup as an alternative. Funny how every climate zone has it's own solution.

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Re: Calorie Dense Crops

#18 Post by Oldplaner » Fri Mar 06, 2020 2:25 am

Farside,

I live in BC, in the Okanagan and the sorghum grows pretty well, if you look at the first pic you'll see there is Floriani corn growing right beside it. They are sown and harvested together so they might grow in your zone. I planted 2nd week of May and harvested the sorghum around Sept 29.

Howdy back Texas,

I am going to plant more fruit and nut trees this year too.We probably have fewer options than you in your climate but Hazelnuts have a decent amount of oil and thrive up here
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Re: Calorie Dense Crops

#19 Post by gadget » Thu Apr 02, 2020 4:09 am

Farside wrote:
Mon Oct 29, 2018 1:54 pm
Most gardening forums and articles focus on leafy greens, tomatoes, herbs and such. This is all great stuff, but in a GSM type of situation, you'll be dead from starvation before these crops are ready to harvest. In a survival situation, calorie dense crops (like oils) are essential. In most climate zones this is pretty straight forward. Not so much when in the colder zones like zone 3.

I'm starting this topic to discuss cold zone crops that are very calorie dense, and have storage abilities to feed you well into May after harvesting it in the previous fall.
If I was in zone 3 I would consider a sunken greenhouse sized to grow enough potatoes to survive on.
I'm in Norther Utah zone 5b and am putting in my second greenhouse this summer. I am very tight on space though. I'm planning to do 2 crops of potatos fall/spring and 1 crop of sweetpotatoes in the hot summer months in this new greenhouse. At least for 80% of the growing space.

For calories we are growing
Potatoes
sweetpotatoes
Sunchokes(sunroot)
Some short season fint corn for grinding and nixtamalization where I can find the space.
Beans if I get low on dry storage

If I was in zone 3 and didn't have a greenhouse, I would do allot of starts early indoors and keep lots of light weight fleece blankets handy for the unexpected frost. Potatoes would have to be the main focus. I would also run some poly pipe in the grow beds for prewarming the soil in the spring and adding heat on cold nights. Soil temp can make a big difference.

I'm planning for some zone 3 like summers where I live when the GSM is at its worst. My wife buys cheap fleece blankets when she sees them at the second hand store. They are light and insulate well. If we get a late frost, its no big deal to go and cover the plants.

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