Mycelium

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Farside
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Mycelium

#1 Post by Farside » Thu Oct 18, 2018 8:07 pm

I live in Northern Canada, and things break down and decompose much slower here. At least the things you want breaking down anyway!

This year I decided that things in my soil are moving altogether too slowly for my linking, and so I embarked on some experiments with what I call accelerated sheet mulch. I'm attempting to compost in place, and using sheet mulching materials to trap moisture and suppress weeds while adding mycelium to the sheet mulch to break it all down fast.

Yes I'll need to add more sheet mulch, but weed suppressing is a secondary bi-product of this process. Carbon stacking is what this system is really about.

I thought I would bring this experiment up here because it had a very unexpected result. By mid-summer I had more oyster mushrooms than I knew what to do with. so I started trading them for all sorts of things. Honey, perennial plants, vegetables...

It turned out to be the most productive year in my vegetable garden not because the plants did exceptionally well (my peas and beans got sick and died), but because people kept giving me bags of produce. And I found my success growing fungus exceeds my ability to ripen tomatoes outside a greenhouse.

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Elew
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Re: Mycelium

#2 Post by Elew » Tue Oct 30, 2018 3:47 pm

Mushrooms are something I would really like to grow, but living in an RV has it's limits. I saw Christian did some videos on using the logs, and I had considered turning one of our cubbies under the RV into a mushroom home, but we would need to do some climate control if we did that.

For now I think I am resigned to gaining knowledge, so I have more ideas on how I should set things up if and when we ever do get some land...
Last night I started watching the Funky Fungi channel and I find her super easy to follow https://www.youtube.com/user/jdjuergensen

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Re: Mycelium

#3 Post by dirtmurphy » Tue Oct 30, 2018 5:09 pm

Hey Elew! Different mushrooms fruit at different temps. All you need to do is research mushrooms that fruit within your temp range. The most obvious yet most overlooked place to start is by researching what edible mushrooms grow in your area. To protect my logs and wood chip beds from long deep freezes, I cover them with a thick layer of leaves. Since you're dealing with a small space, you may only want to go with one type of mushroom. I personally grow shiitake, elm oyster, wood ear, chicken of the woods, and King Stropharia so I can have harvests throughout the year.
Another thing you can do is learn to ID wild edible mushrooms in your area and when you find a fruiting log, bring it home with you. I picked up some fresh Elm logs to inoculate with Elm Oyster and noticed a slime fungus already on them. I left them alone to see what they would do and they turned out to be wood ear mushrooms. They're my most reliable producers and provide us with fresh mushrooms year round.

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Re: Mycelium

#4 Post by Farside » Tue Oct 30, 2018 6:20 pm

Elew wrote:
Tue Oct 30, 2018 3:47 pm
Mushrooms are something I would really like to grow, but living in an RV has it's limits. I saw Christian did some videos on using the logs, and I had considered turning one of our cubbies under the RV into a mushroom home, but we would need to do some climate control if we did that.

For now I think I am resigned to gaining knowledge, so I have more ideas on how I should set things up if and when we ever do get some land...
Last night I started watching the Funky Fungi channel and I find her super easy to follow https://www.youtube.com/user/jdjuergensen
What about guerilla mushroom farming? Find an out of the way space and store an inoculated log (or artificial log made from straw) under some low bushes. Start will oyster mushrooms of shitakes. Nobody will even notice the log, and when they're fruiting then average person will assume they are poisonous toadstools.

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Re: Mycelium

#5 Post by Elew » Wed Oct 31, 2018 6:31 pm

Thanks Dirt and Farside :D

I was looking at this http://www.coloradomushrooms.com/edible.php and some others. For wild mushrooms so far I can find the morel and boletus, because they are easy to spot and identify. I will look for some that grow on logs and try bringing one back. The season is generally april/may through august...but maybe if we bring some indoors...

We can try to stash some logs here and there closer to where we are too...

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Re: Mycelium

#6 Post by Farside » Tue Jul 02, 2019 6:23 pm

It turns out that you can buy pelleted horse bedding in big bags. It's made from straw and is sterile.

Sure it's more expensive pound for pound compared to a bale of straw for making artificial logs, but there is no pasteurization required which is labor intensive and time consuming.

My next artificial logs will be made from this to see how well it performs.

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Re: Mycelium

#7 Post by dirtmurphy » Wed Jul 03, 2019 1:34 am

Good to know!

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Re: Mycelium

#8 Post by Farside » Mon Jul 22, 2019 6:45 pm

I was listening to that interview with Matt Powers and he mentioned mycelium companions for plants. A good example is Siberian pine nut trees and pine bolete.

He mentioned blueberries and I haven't found anything online about that one. The only thing I found was nameko mushrooms companioned with aronia (chokeberry) berry bushes that were inoculated into alder wood chips.

I'd love to know what companion to blueberries has been discovered.

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Re: Mycelium

#9 Post by dirtmurphy » Mon Jul 22, 2019 9:12 pm

I don't know if the companion has been identified yet but it's a common practice to take some soil from a native blueberry stand to inoculate your soil when planting blueberries. I've heard it postulated that maybe the relationship exists with something else that indirectly benefits the bush but I don't know if anyone actually has the answer.
I have experience with planting tomatoes, squash, amaranth, beans, parsley, and rosemary directly into a Stropharia bed and the results are amazing. I hope to inoculate all of my beds with Strophaia now.

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