Resources List

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Lcurrier
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Resources List

#1 Post by Lcurrier » Wed May 01, 2019 11:13 pm

Hi folks,
I just wanted to compile a list of lesser-known food resources that are relatively cold-adapted that can grow through the years as the weather turns colder. Find out your growing zone and pick plants and animals that are adapted to colder climates:
Here’s my contribution:
Perennial Tree Crops:
White Oak species
American chestnut hybrids
Anatovka Apples—grow relatively true from seed
Siberian nut pines
Mulberry

Bush crops:
Blueberry
Bilberry
Hazelnut
Elderberry

Hardy Fowl:
Turkey
Pigeon-self-feeding
Icelandic chickens-lay when it’s dark and cold
Ducks

Hardy Sheep/goats
Icelandic sheep
Alpine goats

Cattle:
Highland cattle
Braunvieh cattle
Yak
Bison/bison hybrids

Farside
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Re: Resources List

#2 Post by Farside » Thu May 02, 2019 4:37 pm

Bush crops:
Haskap (extremely important because it fruits so early)
Strawberry
Hardy Kiwi
Blackcurrant (keep away from white pine species)
Raspberry
Black / red currants
Gooseberry
Jostaberry

Perennial Tree Crops:
Chokecherry
Seabuckthorn
Apple
Cherry
Pear
Serviceberry

Lcurrier
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Re: Resources List

#3 Post by Lcurrier » Fri May 03, 2019 12:05 am

Wild ramps
These grow in shaded locations, pop up earliest in the spring, and suffer when the temps get warmer. I’d be willing to bet that they would come up in a situation where summer doesn’t come. They seem accustomed to a wide range of temperatures southern Appalachia to at least zone 3 where I live at the moment; moving to a warmer climate next month. I just harvested some. They might be the only garlic or onion type crop that will be available in a crisis. You can pickle, freeze, can or dehydrate them for later use as well. If you’re going to wild harvest, don’t take more than 10% of a patch as they grow relatively slowly. You can also plant them if you own a woodland.

Farside
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Re: Resources List

#4 Post by Farside » Fri May 03, 2019 6:25 pm

Yes ramps are a good one. I successfully fall plant hardneck garlic in zone 3, but I put a deep layer of mulch on top and then pull it off in the spring.

Add asparagus and rhubarb to the list.

Lcurrier
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Re: Resources List

#5 Post by Lcurrier » Wed May 08, 2019 5:19 am

The marvelous acorn.
Acorns are wonderful, the sustenance crop of indigenous people’s throughout the world. The reason that acorns went out of popularity as a food source was primarily ignorance or prejudice. It was seen as a poor folk’s food. They take a little processing—a cold water bath— but they are SO nutritious that the natives of California did not have a word for famine at the point of contact. Many oaks do not produce every year, but when they do produce they produce enough for several years, if stored properly. They can effectively supplant our dependence on weather-sensitive grains. They are weather tolerant and durable. Plant varieties for the cold, and start experimenting with neighbor’s “junk” acorns. You can produce an oil that is nutritionally similar to olive oil. You can feed the leavings to poultry or hogs. You can make a protein rich meal. It is well worth your while to plant, and/or identify, and use acorns in the next year and through the next decades.

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Re: Resources List

#6 Post by Farside » Wed Jun 26, 2019 12:17 pm

Oh, horseradish. It was planted here by the Ukrainian immigrants and it now grows wild in the back lanes. Absolutely no care required in zone 3.

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